Medical Malpractice and Personal Injury Law Blog

Florida Car Crash Kills 4 Sisters

Posted by Briggs Bedigian | Jun 20, 2016 | 0 Comments

A single-car accident in Florida over the Memorial Day holiday proved to be devastating for one family, with four sisters dying from their injuries. While the cause of the crash is still under investigation, it is believed that one of the vehicle's front tires malfunctioned while the car was driving on the highway.

Crash Kills Four Sisters in Florida

The accident occurred on I-95, outside Titusville, Florida, just before 7pm on May 30, 2016. Reports indicate that the left front tire separated from the 2006 Dodge Durango, causing the vehicle to spin off the highway and flip multiple times.

While this kind of accident is dangerous enough, on its own, there were 11 people packed into the sport utility vehicle at the time of the accident. Dodge Durangos only seat eight safely, meaning that multiple passengers were not buckled up properly. Multiple passengers were ejected from the car as it flipped, including a toddler, who was found on the far side of the 30-foor barrier wall near where the car came to a rest. While the toddler was found in stable condition, three of the occupants were declared dead at the scene, with a fourth passing away in the hospital shortly thereafter. All of the deceased were girls under the age of 15.

Lawsuits Likely to Follow

In any accident that has such a devastating toll because something malfunctioned, lawsuits for wrongful death and products liability are likely to follow.

In this case, because the cause of the accident has to do with the vehicle's front wheel disconnecting from the car, there will likely be a claim filed against the person or company responsible for attaching it, such as a mechanic and the garage that he or she works for. Additionally, the company that makes the type of axle and that makes the type of wheel involved in the accident are likely to be investigated for their role in the deaths of the four young children.

Impact of the Victims Not Wearing Seatbelts

In any lawsuit that aims to seek justice for the deaths of these four young girls, the defendant will likely claim that they were at fault for not wearing seat belts.

Luckily, this accident happened in the state of Florida, which apportions liability according to the percentage that someone is at fault. Therefore, if this case goes to trial and a jury finds that the girls were 30% at fault for their injuries because they were not buckled up, it will not mean that they cannot receive compensation – only that this compensation will be decreased by 30%.

Personal Injury Attorneys in Maryland

Gilman & Bedigian have established a reputation providing legal representation to clients who have suffered like this family has. Many personal injury lawsuits involve numerous fields of law, including product liability, each of which can be overwhelming to navigate on its own. The skilled attorneys at Gilman & Bedigian, however, provide thorough representation, regardless of how difficult it might be to get the compensation you deserve from the people at fault. Contact our Maryland law office online, or at (800) 529-6162.

About the Author

Briggs Bedigian

H. Briggs Bedigian (“Briggs”) is a founding partner of Gilman & Bedigian, LLC.  Prior to forming Gilman & Bedigian, LLC, Briggs was a partner at Wais, Vogelstein and Bedigian, LLC, where he was the head of the firm's litigation practice.  Briggs' legal practice is focused on representing clients involved in medical malpractice and catastrophic personal injury cases. 

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