MEDICAL MALPRACTICE AND PERSONAL INJURY LAW BLOG

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Woman Suffers Unnecessary Hysterectomy

In 2009, Kelly Currie learned from her doctor that she was diagnosed with cervical cancer. Doctor Kris Ghosh recommended a complete hysterectomy, which involves removal of the cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. Currie took her doctor’s advice and underwent the operation. However, it did not take long for her to realize that something had gone wrong

Currie was still suffering severe pain when she was discharged from the hospital. When she stood up to leave, she said blood went everywhere, all down her legs and all over the floor. Currie continued to suffer additional complications for more than a year after the procedure. She was experiencing regular diarrhea and discovered it was also coming out vaginally. A fistula, or an abnormal hole or connection, had developed between her rectum and vagina. 

Currie underwent two surgeries by Dr. Ghosh to try and repair the rectovaginal fistula, which were unsuccessful. Currie also suffered damage to her bladder, leaving her partially incontinent. She had to wear an ostomy bag because of the problems in the digestive system. An ostomy is a surgical procedure that reroutes bodily waste to the outside of the body through a hole in the abdomen.  

Unnecessary Surgery After Cancer Diagnosis

According to a lawsuit against the doctor, Currie may not have needed a complete hysterectomy. A routine “cone” biopsy of the cervix may have shown that there was a small area of cancer and a complete hysterectomy may have been unnecessary. After many surgical errors, patients wish they had gotten a second opinion before going forward with the highly invasive procedure.

After a medical malpractice trial, the jury determined that Dr. Ghosh was negligent in causing Currie’s injuries and awarded her and her husband almost $1.2 million in damages for medical expenses, loss of companionship, and pain and suffering. 

Previous Finding of Gross Negligence in Patient Care

Dr. Ghosh had been disciplined by the Medical Board of California in the past for gross negligence. In the case of a 66 year-old-patient, an administrative laws judge found Ghosh had committed gross negligence and failed to maintain proper records in treating the patient. Ghosh was also found to have removed the patient’s uterus without informed consent. Ghosh was put on administrative probation for 3 years. 

Cervical Cancer Malpractice

Cervical cancer occurs in the cervix, the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Early stages of cervical cancer generally show no signs or symptoms. Later stages of advanced cervical cancer may involve vaginal bleeding after intercourse, vaginal discharge, or pelvic pain during intercourse. 

Diagnosis of cervical cancer generally involves a screening test, including a pap test or an HPV DNA test. A Pap test can show abnormal or cancerous cells in the cervix. If a biopsy shows reason for concern, an OB/GYN may perform a cone biopsy, to get to deeper layers of the cervix for cervical cell tests. 

If you were harmed because of negligent care by a doctor or OB/GYN, speak with a medical malpractice attorney. Fill out an online case evaluation form or call (800) 529-6162 today to talk to our team. 

About the Author

Briggs Bedigian
Briggs Bedigian

H. Briggs Bedigian (“Briggs”) is a founding partner of Gilman & Bedigian, LLC.  Prior to forming Gilman & Bedigian, LLC, Briggs was a partner at Wais, Vogelstein and Bedigian, LLC, where he was the head of the firm’s litigation practice.  Briggs’ legal practice is focused on representing clients involved in medical malpractice and catastrophic personal injury cases. 

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